Trainers and Organisers

Core Trainers


Éva Rambala (Hungary)

I cannot decide if my pain or excitement is bigger in relation to this IIT. After having participated in more than 40 IITs, led by Marshall, for me this is going to be the first one without him being physically present.

I am scared, if I will be able to live the spirit of NVC under such intensity for 9 days with 70 people living together. My crutch is:

“If something worth doing, it worth doing poorly”

Marshall Rosenberg

Once, when I felt really lonely, I asked myself: who are the people or group of people to whom I am really committed to connect? The answer I found in my heart is, beside my biological family, those who are well experienced in practicing empathic presence and honesty without criticism. We can call this the practice of NVC. It is a special joy to have real conflicts with such people, because through them, I can understand myself and the other person on a much deeper level. And somehow, after reconnection there is learning and celebration.

 

About Éva Rambala:

  • Vast experience: over the last 20 years, Eva has delivered 2.500+ workshop days of Nonviolent Communication training in 35+ countries. Prior to her career as a trainer, Eva acquired 10 years of business experience.
  • Flexibility: In addition to large and small business clients, Eva has clients in the world of education (from kindergartens to universities), NGOs, government services (hospitals, prisons and orphanages), and in the Civil society (spiritual communities).
  • Recognised authority: Eva began her NVC career by working closely with Marshall Rosenberg, the inventor of this method, for five consecutive years. She has gone on to give popular “train the trainer” programs.

Qualifications:

  • 2009 European University Center for Peace Studies,
  • Master of Arts in Peace and Conflict Studies,
  • 1999 Certified trainer of the International Center for Nonviolent Communication;
  • 1995 Budapest Business School, Faculty of Pedagogy;
  • 1987 Budapest Business School, Faculty of Commerce;

Professional experience:

  • 1999 to date Certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent Communication
 (www.cnvc.org)
  • Eastern European Coordinator (since 2002);
  • 1994 – 2000 Sämling Ltd, Department leader;
  • 1989 – 1994 Irodakultura Studio, Project manager.

Publications in Hungarian:

  • Rambala Éva – Szívek és szavak CD
  • Bagdy E. – Bishop, B. – Böjte Cs. – Rambala É.: Hidak egymáshoz – Empátia, kommunikáció, konfliktusok
  • Rambala Éva – Erőszakmentes kommunikáció

Self-introduction:

I am in love with this process, called Nonviolent communication (NVC). Practicing it is the greatest improvement in the quality of my life. The idea that I can be honest without criticising gives me much bigger freedom than I have ever imagined having, before I met NVC. Being able to guess the other person’s possible feelings and needs reduces the number of “idiots” around me to zero. I am not saying that empathic guesses are my first thoughts all the time, but sooner or later I will get there.

So, I experience much more freedom and safety.

I discovered this approach in 1996. Ever since I have been committed to use it in every aspect of my life: handling conflicts in my family in an honest and loving way, working effectively and in a compassionate manner, taking full responsibility for my actions and thoughts, taking meaningful actions and contributing to the best of my ability to social change.

In 1999, I quit my business job and started my career as an NVC trainer. In 2000, I became an authorized trainer of the International Center for Nonviolent Communication (CNVC). I worked closely with Marshall Rosenberg, the founder of CNVC, for 5 years, on a couple of hundred trainings.

Since 2000, I have been serving as Eastern European project coordinator of CNVC. In this role, my task is to support the creation and strengthening of Eastern European NVC teams and to train the local NVC trainers. The projects are not coordinated by CNVC anymore, but my heart is still in sharing NVC in this region.

I have worked in more than 35 countries, for various companies, open groups, in orphanages, universities, schools, prisons, hospitals, “train the trainer” programs, spiritual communities.


Chris Rajendram (Srí Lanka)

I met Marshall in 1996 while pursuing my studies on communication at the Ohio State University. I was searching for something that could help my war torn country and the war weary people.  

At the very first session with Marshall, it became very clear that I have found the teachings that I was looking for. I immediately started integrating the learnings of NVC into my life. NVC became my life. It lit up my life from every corner. I learnt to be present. I continue to learn to be present….


Maria Arpa

Maria is founder and Chief Executive of Centre for Peaceful Solutions. She has made interpersonal skills a lifetime project. Growing up in London in housing declared unfit for human habitation to immigrant parents, Maria experienced first-hand just how easy it is to become dysfunctional. Her Maltese parents were traumatised by World War Two which added to the stress of growing up in poverty. Through a sheer refusal to accept her lot in life, she removed herself from the slums and began a journey of development.

Alongside a 25-year career in marketing and advertising, she developed her talent for engaging people in healthy conversations through her experiences as a Samaritan Volunteer, a Counsellor, a Reiki Master, a Mediator and Chief Executive of a community mediation service. Maria also spent time at the sharp end running her own business for 15 years and working as a stand-up comic for 5 years whilst bringing up 2 children.

In 2004, having run a community mediation service for 3 years and developed her own ideas about social change, community engagement and conflict resolution, Maria went solo and began working on her doorstep in the London Borough of Brent engaging statutory agencies and local people in ideas of Nonviolent Communication, Conflict Resolution and Restorative Justice. Others were soon interested in participating- and a team began to form.

At a time when the mediation industry’s general opinion was that mediation was not possible when there has been physical violence or police involvement, Maria set out to prove that violent people can engage in healthy conversations when facilitated and guided. With that in mind, in 2006, and as a direct response to the increase in gun crime and drive-by shootings on her road, where the local community were still mourning the fatal shooting of 7 year old, Toni Ann Byfield, Maria set up The Centre for Peaceful Solutions; a charity dedicated to helping people resolve conflict without the use of violence.

Maria developed the Dialogue Road Map – a communications tool designed to break down barriers and get engagement when the other person is resistant, hostile, angry, violent or resentful. The Dialogue Road Map draws on Needs Based Theory, Person Centred Counselling, Nonviolence Philosophy and Appreciative Enquiry. Maria’s key influencers are Marshall Rosenberg, Carl Rogers, Gene Sharpe and Alfie Kohn.

Maria came to understand how conflict is at the heart of destructive behaviour and that, with a change in attitude towards it, conflict could be the source of positive change.  Maria chose to devote her life to sharing this learning with people who have fewer options in life in order to help them realise their own capacity to contribute to their own well-being and to their community. Her own background has been key in her ability to reach ‘hard to reach’ people. Maria’s expertise is in building rapport quickly even when the other person is hostile or resistant and in teaching others how it is done even when they have limited capacity to learn.

As part of her work Maria has trained healthcare professionals and frontline workers including Social Workers, Doctors, Police Officers, Prison Officers and Teachers in how to engage service users into co-operative relationships by diffusing conflict and motivating positive change. Maria also works one on one with people who have mental disorders such as Schizophrenia, Addictions, Eating Disorders, PTSD, Insomnia and Gender Dysphoria. Her skill is in reaching and giving voice to the part of them that wants to make positive change.

In 2007, Peaceful Solutions was awarded half a million pounds by Central Government to develop a model of mediation for violent crime and anti-social behaviour. The work took her into some of the most deprived areas of London where she and her team engaged with gang members, violent offenders, local youth, many of whom were labelled as having mental health or anti-social behaviour issues. In 2009 the work was instrumental in preventing a retaliation shooting.

Her work takes her into communities, organisations, schools and prisons where she engages with the most challenging and influential participants. She works in the UK, Europe and New York passing on the skills which empower people to take self-responsibility and to find solutions.

She has been pleasantly surprised by the warm welcome she receives from beneficiaries and undeterred by the inability of statutory agency workers to challenge their systems to change in difficult and recurring situations. Currently, the charity is working on a ground breaking project in Dartmoor prison, a wellbeing project at Wellington College and Holistic Education Community project in Greece, where the Dialogue Road Map is at the heart of communication.

Maria believes that when people believe they have no ‘voice’, they resort to violence, manipulation, self-harm and other destructive behaviours as tragic attempts to be heard. The driving force behind Maria’s work is showing people who feel excluded, marginalised, disadvantaged or powerless how to articulate their needs in ways which are more likely to be heard and how to challenge ‘authority’ in ways which are more likely to get their needs met.

Maria is a former Chair of Mediation UK, has a Master’s degree in mediation and conflict resolution and is a sought after speaker and trainer. As a mother and grandmother she recognises the importance of authentic communication mother and along with her partner David, who now co-runs the charity with her, she strives to model the communication they seek to share in their work.

Described, in 2012, by the Civil Mediation Council as one of the UK’s ‘top’ mediators, the Dialogue Road Map has gained recognition amongst senior professionals in the mediation industry.

Maria’s experience ranges from Multi-National Corporate conflict to Street Gang threats to life and everything in between. Typically, neighbours at war, youth conflicts, family break up, family reconciliation, business deals gone wrong, interpersonal conflicts at work and group communication break-down.

Maria is the mastermind behind the Centre for Peaceful Solutions which she leads and directs in collaboration with her board, staff, volunteers and members.

Maria’s books, The Heart of Mindful Relationships and Mindfulness at Work, have received positive reviews.

See

www.centreforpeacefulsolutions.org


Volunteer Trainers


Organizers


Éva Rambala (Hungary)

I cannot decide if my pain or excitement is bigger in relation to this IIT. After having participated in more than 40 IITs, led by Marshall, for me this is going to be the first one without him being physically present.

I am scared, if I will be able to live the spirit of NVC under such intensity for 9 days with 70 people living together. My crutch is:

“If something worth doing, it worth doing poorly”

Marshall Rosenberg

Once, when I felt really lonely, I asked myself: who are the people or group of people to whom I am really committed to connect? The answer I found in my heart is, beside my biological family, those who are well experienced in practicing empathic presence and honesty without criticism. We can call this the practice of NVC. It is a special joy to have real conflicts with such people, because through them, I can understand myself and the other person on a much deeper level. And somehow, after reconnection there is learning and celebration.

 

About Éva Rambala:

  • Vast experience: over the last 20 years, Eva has delivered 2.500+ workshop days of Nonviolent Communication training in 35+ countries. Prior to her career as a trainer, Eva acquired 10 years of business experience.
  • Flexibility: In addition to large and small business clients, Eva has clients in the world of education (from kindergartens to universities), NGOs, government services (hospitals, prisons and orphanages), and in the Civil society (spiritual communities).
  • Recognised authority: Eva began her NVC career by working closely with Marshall Rosenberg, the inventor of this method, for five consecutive years. She has gone on to give popular “train the trainer” programs.

Qualifications:

  • 2009 European University Center for Peace Studies,
  • Master of Arts in Peace and Conflict Studies,
  • 1999 Certified trainer of the International Center for Nonviolent Communication;
  • 1995 Budapest Business School, Faculty of Pedagogy;
  • 1987 Budapest Business School, Faculty of Commerce;

Professional experience:

  • 1999 to date Certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent Communication
 (www.cnvc.org)
  • Eastern European Coordinator (since 2002);
  • 1994 – 2000 Sämling Ltd, Department leader;
  • 1989 – 1994 Irodakultura Studio, Project manager.

Publications in Hungarian:

  • Rambala Éva – Szívek és szavak CD
  • Bagdy E. – Bishop, B. – Böjte Cs. – Rambala É.: Hidak egymáshoz – Empátia, kommunikáció, konfliktusok
  • Rambala Éva – Erőszakmentes kommunikáció

Self-introduction:

I am in love with this process, called Nonviolent communication (NVC). Practicing it is the greatest improvement in the quality of my life. The idea that I can be honest without criticising gives me much bigger freedom than I have ever imagined having, before I met NVC. Being able to guess the other person’s possible feelings and needs reduces the number of “idiots” around me to zero. I am not saying that empathic guesses are my first thoughts all the time, but sooner or later I will get there.

So, I experience much more freedom and safety.

I discovered this approach in 1996. Ever since I have been committed to use it in every aspect of my life: handling conflicts in my family in an honest and loving way, working effectively and in a compassionate manner, taking full responsibility for my actions and thoughts, taking meaningful actions and contributing to the best of my ability to social change.

In 1999, I quit my business job and started my career as an NVC trainer. In 2000, I became an authorized trainer of the International Center for Nonviolent Communication (CNVC). I worked closely with Marshall Rosenberg, the founder of CNVC, for 5 years, on a couple of hundred trainings.

Since 2000, I have been serving as Eastern European project coordinator of CNVC. In this role, my task is to support the creation and strengthening of Eastern European NVC teams and to train the local NVC trainers. The projects are not coordinated by CNVC anymore, but my heart is still in sharing NVC in this region.

I have worked in more than 35 countries, for various companies, open groups, in orphanages, universities, schools, prisons, hospitals, “train the trainer” programs, spiritual communities.


Anna Pataki (Hungary)

I have been working as a management consultant and project manager for more than ten years in Hungary and internationally. I like many things about it, including the structural thinking, the complexity, the creativity and the interactions with many different people. When I met NVC, shortly after the birth of my daughter, I discovered that I can consider the world I had been living in as “a world of the brain”, and through NVC, I found a whole new world out there, that I may call “a world of the heart”.

I am so grateful for getting to know this whole new world, this “thing” so-called NVC (I heard from Kathleen Macferran that at a training, Marshall started with the statement that “There is no such thing as NVC…”). There are so many things I have been learning and experiencing thanks to it, like connecting to people I could never imagine connecting to before, expressing difficult messages honestly or saying no while strengthening the relationship with the other person, turning with empathy towards myself and others in tense situations (or at least after the situation:) ), the power of “just” being present… and I could go on with this list for a while.

I believe that both the “world of the brain” and “that of the heart” have their places in life, and if I can make a conscious choice about which one I am living in in certain moments, it gives me so much freedom, understanding and opportunities to connect with other people in a way that serves us best.

I am so excited to co-organize this IIT, to get to know several new people from around the Globe with whom we share an interest in taking the journey of NVC, and also to meet people again from this world-wide community; to learn and develop throughout the (sometimes bumpy) road towards the event and during the IIT as well.