Trainers and Organisers

Core Trainers


Éva Rambala (Hungary)

I cannot decide if my pain or excitement is bigger in relation to this IIT. After having participated in more than 40 IITs, led by Marshall, for me this is going to be the first one without him being physically present.

I am scared, if I will be able to live the spirit of NVC under such intensity for 9 days with 70 people living together. My crutch is:

“If something worth doing, it worth doing poorly”

Marshall Rosenberg

Once, when I felt really lonely, I asked myself: who are the people or group of people to whom I am really committed to connect? The answer I found in my heart is, beside my biological family, those who are well experienced in practicing empathic presence and honesty without criticism. We can call this the practice of NVC. It is a special joy to have real conflicts with such people, because through them, I can understand myself and the other person on a much deeper level. And somehow, after reconnection there is learning and celebration.

 

About Éva Rambala:

  • Vast experience: over the last 20 years, Eva has delivered 2.500+ workshop days of Nonviolent Communication training in 35+ countries. Prior to her career as a trainer, Eva acquired 10 years of business experience.
  • Flexibility: In addition to large and small business clients, Eva has clients in the world of education (from kindergartens to universities), NGOs, government services (hospitals, prisons and orphanages), and in the Civil society (spiritual communities).
  • Recognised authority: Eva began her NVC career by working closely with Marshall Rosenberg, the inventor of this method, for five consecutive years. She has gone on to give popular “train the trainer” programs.

Qualifications:

  • 2009 European University Center for Peace Studies,
  • Master of Arts in Peace and Conflict Studies,
  • 1999 Certified trainer of the International Center for Nonviolent Communication;
  • 1995 Budapest Business School, Faculty of Pedagogy;
  • 1987 Budapest Business School, Faculty of Commerce;

Professional experience:

  • 1999 to date Certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent Communication
 (www.cnvc.org)
  • Eastern European Coordinator (since 2002);
  • 1994 – 2000 Sämling Ltd, Department leader;
  • 1989 – 1994 Irodakultura Studio, Project manager.

Publications in Hungarian:

  • Rambala Éva – Szívek és szavak CD
  • Bagdy E. – Bishop, B. – Böjte Cs. – Rambala É.: Hidak egymáshoz – Empátia, kommunikáció, konfliktusok
  • Rambala Éva – Erőszakmentes kommunikáció

Self-introduction:

I am in love with this process, called Nonviolent communication (NVC). Practicing it is the greatest improvement in the quality of my life. The idea that I can be honest without criticising gives me much bigger freedom than I have ever imagined having, before I met NVC. Being able to guess the other person’s possible feelings and needs reduces the number of “idiots” around me to zero. I am not saying that empathic guesses are my first thoughts all the time, but sooner or later I will get there.

So, I experience much more freedom and safety.

I discovered this approach in 1996. Ever since I have been committed to use it in every aspect of my life: handling conflicts in my family in an honest and loving way, working effectively and in a compassionate manner, taking full responsibility for my actions and thoughts, taking meaningful actions and contributing to the best of my ability to social change.

In 1999, I quit my business job and started my career as an NVC trainer. In 2000, I became an authorized trainer of the International Center for Nonviolent Communication (CNVC). I worked closely with Marshall Rosenberg, the founder of CNVC, for 5 years, on a couple of hundred trainings.

Since 2000, I have been serving as Eastern European project coordinator of CNVC. In this role, my task is to support the creation and strengthening of Eastern European NVC teams and to train the local NVC trainers. The projects are not coordinated by CNVC anymore, but my heart is still in sharing NVC in this region.

I have worked in more than 35 countries, for various companies, open groups, in orphanages, universities, schools, prisons, hospitals, “train the trainer” programs, spiritual communities.


Carl Plesner (Denmark)

As a colleague in the team I think that you may experience me as flexible, highly curious and mostly calm and relaxed team member in meetings. I also hear from people that I at times in trainings can be perceived as intense in my energy, and for some this can be experienced as overwhelming and for others as inspiration and resonance.

These are some session topics that I (at this moment) imagine I can bring to an IIT. All topics are aimed toward ordinary life situations with family, children, colleagues, friends and business partners:

  • Thoughts about what NVC is: a way of understanding life, a way of using power and a way to communicate, or?
  • Exploring and practicing processes of reconciliation and restoration of relationships
  • How to mediate conflicts
  • How to negotiate mutual caring and satisfying agreements with family, friends, colleagues and others
  • Transforming rebellion / submission to choice and self-empowerment, for yourself and others
  • When and how to apply the protective compassionate use of force
  • De-fusing anger and aggression, revealing and reconnecting with the life-enriching energy behind it
  • Restorative practices; how to maintain mutual caring relationships, fellowships and communities in order to prevent violent conflicts
  • What to do when “NVC doesn’t work” (hint; there’s always a way forward with NVC)
  • Exploring the relationship between love and violence
  • Children as our teachers in gardening: how to support seeds to grow and flourish and become that unique beautiful life-enriching plant that the seed always where meant to be.

These topics arrive from my experiences working with NVC. Mostly, I have applied NVC in working with a large variety of conflicts, and to a somewhat lesser degree I have worked as a NVC trainer. I have worked primarily in these three fields:

The first sphere is restorative justice and reconciliation. Working for Danish police for 5 years I have facilitated numerous meetings between receivers and authors of violence. This includes cases of domestic violence, and basically many other forms of violence one can imagine.
From this I have learned about how to apply the tools of NVC to support healing and transformation between parties in the aftermath of violence. I have learned a lot about how violence are connected to dignity and about those mechanisms in society and relationships that promote the possibility of an individual choosing violence as a strategy.

The second sphere is working with schoolchildren (in ages 11-15). I was a hired by schools as a “dialogue learning facilitator” to work with school classes that struggled from a tense and stress full social environment.

From these children I have learned a lot about how children evaluate and interpreted the acts of adults and what reasons children have have when they lie and rebel to adult authority. And also about what makes children submit to adult authority and what consequences it has for them. I have also learned a lot about what children sees that adults can do in order to support a safe, trustful and friendly learning environment in schools.

The third sphere is conflicts at national community levels. Since my participation in the revolution almost 4 years ago in Ukraine I have in various roles worked intensively responding to this and the following war with Russia. Both as an individual, as an international diplomat and now in a NGO.

In this sphere I have talked with, listened to, trained and facilitated dialogues and negotiations for radical ultra left and right wing groups, armed activists, riot police, military, armed rebel separatists and so many more involved in war, riots and violent confrontations ranging from a local community level to national levels.

From this I have learned a lot about the compassionate use of force as an opposite to punitive use of force. I have learned that the mechanisms I saw with authors and receivers of domestic violence and from the children are the exact same as the mechanisms at a national/international level. I also learned about why there’s still so much war and conflict in the world, and some particular reasons of why NVC doesn’t always make a miracle of peace in war, uprisings and riots.

Today:

These days I am lead trainer of training programme in which carefully selected Ukrainians are learning skills such as negotiation, mediation, dialogue facilitation and NVC in general. During this 1-year full time training programme participants receive around 67 days of training within the first 6 months, and the rest of the time they work in their local community in order to support that community to respond to disputes nonviolently.

The participants receive a scholarship during this year in order to support their living. The aim is to build local capacity in Ukraine to engage and respond to any type of conflicts that are hurting the people and splitting the communities.


Chris Rajendram (depending on Travel possibilities, probably online) (Srí Lanka)

I met Marshall in 1996 while pursuing my studies on communication at the Ohio State University. I was searching for something that could help my war torn country and the war weary people.  

At the very first session with Marshall, it became very clear that I have found the teachings that I was looking for. I immediately started integrating the learnings of NVC into my life. NVC became my life. It lit up my life from every corner. I learnt to be present. I continue to learn to be present….


Michael Dillo (Germany, Switzerland)

I was born in Hannover, Germany, in May 1958. After leaving school, I began studying civil engineering – a path that was based on my motivation to get my fathers acknowledgement as I realized many years later. He was a civil engineer too. In my PhD thesis, I specialized in underground constructions in rock, a decision that paved the way for my move to Switzerland, where I live to this day.

I enjoyed living in this beautiful country, but I started to feel increasingly dissatisfied with my job as an engineer. I was disheartened dealing with technical questions all day, and I struggled with my fear of change and messages of: I “have” to pay for my family, I “have” to finance my house, my insurances, my car, the vacation…
In 1997 I was inspired to attend a workshop with Marshall B. Rosenberg to find some answers to my questions and fears. During these first three day-seminar, I received some fundamental life-changing answers. However, it took me quite a while to understand the difference between intellectually understanding NVC and internalizing it. For many years I began to connect with feelings and needs as I had never done in life before – I began to empathize with myself and others.
In 2002 I had begun to trust in myself so that I was able to quit my engineering job without feelings of fear or guilt. Again and again, I was fascinated by and grateful for the experience that things, people, inspiration, even money come “by chance“. I have been a CNVC certified trainer since 2004. In 2013 I was asked to join the CNVC assessors team of the German-speaking part of Switzerland and the CALF team in the USA. As an assessor, I support the work of the international assessor’s group as a member of the CCC (Certification Coordinating Council) since 2015.


Volunteer Trainers


Beata Holtyn (Poland)

psychologist, facilitator and Assistant Professor at Kazimierz Wielki University (Poland) for over 15 years, author of “Marriage and support” (invited to TV for an interview after publishing her book) and scientific articles on relationships and communication.

For years she tried to understand human relationships learning different skills and methods, traveling and living abroad (over a year in India). She loves to dance  and identifies herself as highly sensitive person. Co-owner (with her husband) of Strefa Slow NVC (Zone of words – strefaslow.pl).


Piotr Holtyn (Poland)

software engineer, specialist in international companies: Nokia, Lucent Technologies, Alcatel in Research and Development, where communication with people and machines were the key skills to use, learn and teach.

Author of scientific articles on communication. Disappointed with hierarchical systems he decided to find different ways to be with people. Co-owner (with his wife) of Strefa Slow NVC (Zone of words – strefaslow.pl). Traveler and photographer – he had been to over 20 countries in Europe, Africa and Asia.


Organizers


Éva Rambala (Hungary)

I cannot decide if my pain or excitement is bigger in relation to this IIT. After having participated in more than 40 IITs, led by Marshall, for me this is going to be the first one without him being physically present.

I am scared, if I will be able to live the spirit of NVC under such intensity for 9 days with 70 people living together. My crutch is:

“If something worth doing, it worth doing poorly”

Marshall Rosenberg

Once, when I felt really lonely, I asked myself: who are the people or group of people to whom I am really committed to connect? The answer I found in my heart is, beside my biological family, those who are well experienced in practicing empathic presence and honesty without criticism. We can call this the practice of NVC. It is a special joy to have real conflicts with such people, because through them, I can understand myself and the other person on a much deeper level. And somehow, after reconnection there is learning and celebration.

 

About Éva Rambala:

  • Vast experience: over the last 20 years, Eva has delivered 2.500+ workshop days of Nonviolent Communication training in 35+ countries. Prior to her career as a trainer, Eva acquired 10 years of business experience.
  • Flexibility: In addition to large and small business clients, Eva has clients in the world of education (from kindergartens to universities), NGOs, government services (hospitals, prisons and orphanages), and in the Civil society (spiritual communities).
  • Recognised authority: Eva began her NVC career by working closely with Marshall Rosenberg, the inventor of this method, for five consecutive years. She has gone on to give popular “train the trainer” programs.

Qualifications:

  • 2009 European University Center for Peace Studies,
  • Master of Arts in Peace and Conflict Studies,
  • 1999 Certified trainer of the International Center for Nonviolent Communication;
  • 1995 Budapest Business School, Faculty of Pedagogy;
  • 1987 Budapest Business School, Faculty of Commerce;

Professional experience:

  • 1999 to date Certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent Communication
 (www.cnvc.org)
  • Eastern European Coordinator (since 2002);
  • 1994 – 2000 Sämling Ltd, Department leader;
  • 1989 – 1994 Irodakultura Studio, Project manager.

Publications in Hungarian:

  • Rambala Éva – Szívek és szavak CD
  • Bagdy E. – Bishop, B. – Böjte Cs. – Rambala É.: Hidak egymáshoz – Empátia, kommunikáció, konfliktusok
  • Rambala Éva – Erőszakmentes kommunikáció

Self-introduction:

I am in love with this process, called Nonviolent communication (NVC). Practicing it is the greatest improvement in the quality of my life. The idea that I can be honest without criticising gives me much bigger freedom than I have ever imagined having, before I met NVC. Being able to guess the other person’s possible feelings and needs reduces the number of “idiots” around me to zero. I am not saying that empathic guesses are my first thoughts all the time, but sooner or later I will get there.

So, I experience much more freedom and safety.

I discovered this approach in 1996. Ever since I have been committed to use it in every aspect of my life: handling conflicts in my family in an honest and loving way, working effectively and in a compassionate manner, taking full responsibility for my actions and thoughts, taking meaningful actions and contributing to the best of my ability to social change.

In 1999, I quit my business job and started my career as an NVC trainer. In 2000, I became an authorized trainer of the International Center for Nonviolent Communication (CNVC). I worked closely with Marshall Rosenberg, the founder of CNVC, for 5 years, on a couple of hundred trainings.

Since 2000, I have been serving as Eastern European project coordinator of CNVC. In this role, my task is to support the creation and strengthening of Eastern European NVC teams and to train the local NVC trainers. The projects are not coordinated by CNVC anymore, but my heart is still in sharing NVC in this region.

I have worked in more than 35 countries, for various companies, open groups, in orphanages, universities, schools, prisons, hospitals, “train the trainer” programs, spiritual communities.


Zoltán Varga (Hungary)

I got into NVC because I was getting angry a lot. One day I found myself tearing my girlfriends’s hair. At that moment I felt powerful, but after it I felt shame and sadness.

Then I read from Marshall that the cause of my anger is not what other people do, but what I think about it. Immediately the light went on: I can do something about it! So I went deep into this process and my inner world, and I try to use my power in ways that give me more chance to get what I want.

In the meantime I’ve co-created an NVC men’s group which gives so much to my life. Thanks to this, I have friends who I can call when I’m either in joy or pain, and they are happy to be with my joy or pain. And we have great fun. I’m not sure what more I can wish for.


Anna Pataki (Hungary)

I have been working as a management consultant and project manager for more than ten years in Hungary and internationally. I like many things about it, including the structural thinking, the complexity, the creativity and the interactions with many different people. When I met NVC, shortly after the birth of my daughter, I discovered that I can consider the world I had been living in as “a world of the brain”, and through NVC, I found a whole new world out there, that I may call “a world of the heart”.

I am so grateful for getting to know this whole new world, this “thing” so-called NVC (I heard from Kathleen Macferran that at a training, Marshall started with the statement that “There is no such thing as NVC…”). There are so many things I have been learning and experiencing thanks to it, like connecting to people I could never imagine connecting to before, expressing difficult messages honestly or saying no while strengthening the relationship with the other person, turning with empathy towards myself and others in tense situations (or at least after the situation:) ), the power of “just” being present… and I could go on with this list for a while.

I believe that both the “world of the brain” and “that of the heart” have their places in life, and if I can make a conscious choice about which one I am living in in certain moments, it gives me so much freedom, understanding and opportunities to connect with other people in a way that serves us best.

I am so excited to co-organize this IIT, to get to know several new people from around the Globe with whom we share an interest in taking the journey of NVC, and also to meet people again from this world-wide community; to learn and develop throughout the (sometimes bumpy) road towards the event and during the IIT as well.